Gereau develops implantable wireless devices that trigger- and may block- pain signals

Building on wireless technology that has the potential to interfere with pain, scientists have developed flexible, implantable devices that can activate and, in theory, block pain signals in the body.

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Exploring the brain’s role in stress-induced anxiety​​​

Using cutting-edge techniques,  researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis showed they could shine a light into the brain to activate the stress response in mice.

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Device delivers drugs to brain via remote control​​

Researchers in the Washington University Department of Anesthesiology have developed a wireless device that can be implanted in the brain and activated by remote control to deliver drugs.

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Patrick O’Neill to Receive MBoC Paper of the Year Award

As a postdoc in N. Gautam’s lab, O’Neill was first author of the article Subcellular optogenetic inhibition of G proteins generates signaling gradients and cell migration.

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Light — not pain-killing drugs — used to activate brain’s opioid receptors

Researchers, led by Michael R. Bruchas, PhD, assistant professor of anesthesiology, have influenced the behavior of mice using light, rather than drugs, to activate the reward response.

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